Northern song Yijing exegesis and the formation of Neo-Confucianism by Tze-Ki Hon

Cover of: Northern song Yijing exegesis and the formation of Neo-Confucianism | Tze-Ki Hon

Published .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Yi jing.,
  • Neo-Confucianism.

Edition Notes

Book details

Statementby Tze-Ki Hon.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofilm 94/2509 (B)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationii, 219 leaves.
Number of Pages219
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1241955M
LC Control Number94628709

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There is no doubt that many of the ideas and terms first introduced in the Yi Jing play significant roles in Neo-Confucian thinking on many subjects. This past semester, as one of the four stage-setting class sessions that came at the beginning of my course on Neo-Confucianism, I introduced the core text of the Yi Jing, discussed some specific hexagrams with my students, and then we.

out of 5 stars Review of Bol's Neo-Confucianism in History Reviewed in the United States on For a long time students of Neo-Confucianism are yearning for a thorough examination on and fruition of research in recent decades in English world on 5/5(2). Neo-Confucianism is a philosophically sophisticated tradition weaving classical Confucianism together with themes from Buddhism and Daoism.

It began in China around the eleventh century CE, played a leading role in East Asian cultures over the last millennium, and Cited by: This book is the first comprehensive study of Yijing (Book of Changes) commentary during the Northern Song period, showing how it reflects a coming to terms with major political and social changes.

Seen as a transitional period in China’s history, the Northern Song (–) is often described as the midpoint in the Tang-Song transition or as the beginning of Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism.

Song-era neo-Confucianism, given the general designation of Daoxue (Study of the Way), was an extremely scholarly and academic movement that gained its strength in the state schools and, particularly, in the private academies.

Its major philosophical principles were found in annotations that successive intellectuals appended to the traditional classics, which concentrated on philosophical explanations rather than on philosophical clarifications as was common for pre-Song commentaries.

Confucian scholar of the Southern Song who wrote commentaries to the Four Books of the Confucian tradition and synthesized various philosophical ideas of the Confucian revival.

Zhu Xi’s synthesis was accepted as the orthodox interpretation of Confucianism in the later Ming and Qing dynasties, as well as in other East Asian countries.

 The main parts of Neo-Confucianism were: The civil service examination system, which was the test required to take to become a scholar-official. Becoming a scholar-official was the main way into the Song government. "the Four Books" were the basis of Neo-Confucianism, and they were written by Zhu Xi.

The Yijing and Chinese Politics: Classical Commentary and Literati Activism in the Northern Song Period, (Albany: State University of New York Press, ).

VII. Articles and Book Chapters 1. “A Rock, a Text, and a Tablet: The Making of the Song Emperor‟s Terrace as a Lieu de. Huang's book analyzes the major Neo-Confucian philosophers from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries.

Focusing on metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical philosophical issues, this study presents the historical development of the Neo-Confucian school, an outgrowth of ancient Confucianism, and characterizes its thought, background, and influence.

The Renaissance of Confucianism During Late Tang Dynasty - Early Song Time Neo-Confucianists and their World View - Zhu Xi and his Philosophy of Universal Order and Human Nature - Lu Jiuyuan and his Philosophy of the Mind The Renaissance of Confucianism During Late Tang Dynasty The renaissance of Confucianism was a direct reaction against the long prevailing of philosophical Daoism since the.

The Sinologist Michael Nylan describes the I Ching as the best-known Chinese book in the world. In East Asia, it is a foundational text for the Confucian and Daoist philosophical traditions, while in the West, it attracted the attention of Enlightenment intellectuals and prominent literary and cultural y: Zhou dynasty (China).

Northern Song 'Yijing' Exegesis And The Formation Of Neo-Confucianism. (UnM)AAI In Sinological scholarship, the Yijing commentaries are only studied to clarify the text. By comparing five Yijing commentaries written be tween the second century and the eleventh century, I demonstrate how.

Tze-ki Hon, Northern Song "Yijing" Exegesis and the Formation of Neo-Confucianism (AnnArbor: University Microfilms, ),a recent dissertation from the University of Chicago.

2TheTen Wings were written in late Warring States and early Han times, though the Shuogua (Explanations of the Trigrams, Wing 7) certainly draws on much earlier traditions. By “Neo-Confucianism,” Bol means a specific body of thought first developed in the Northern Song by Zhou Dunyi, Zhang Zai, and the Cheng brothers Yi and Hao, and, after a hiatus, resumed by.

For Cheng Yi's commentaries on the Book of Changes, see Tze-ki Hon's "Northern Song 'Yijing' Exegesis and the Formation of Neo-Confucianism" (Ph.D.

diss., University of Chicago, ). Cheng Yi's notion of principle is discussed by Kidder Smith, Jr., in his "Ch'eng I and the Pattern of Heaven-and-Earth," in Sung Dynasty Uses of the I Ching, edited by Kidder Smith, Jr.

et al. (Princeton, ). The book can be aptly used as both an introduction to Neo-Confucianism for beginners and a top reference for researchers, which is itself a rare achievement." Reviewed by Bin Song, Washington College Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, March From the PublisherBrand: Wiley.

This book is the first comprehensive study of Yijing (Book of Changes) commentary during the Northern Song period, showing how it reflects a coming to terms with major political and social : Kai Marchal. Neo-Confucianism (Chinese: 宋明理學; pinyin: Sòng-Míng lǐxué, often shortened to lixue 理學) is a moral, ethical, and metaphysical Chinese philosophy influenced by Confucianism, and originated with Han Yu and Li Ao (–) in the Tang Dynasty, and became prominent during the Song and Ming dynasties.

Neo-Confucianism could have been an attempt to create a more rationalist and Literal meaning: "Song-Ming [dynasty] rational idealism". The Yijing and Chinese Politics: Classical Commentary and Literati Activism in the Northern Song Period, Albany: SUNY Press, [H, P] Hymes, Robert, and Schirokauer, Conrad, eds.

Ordering the World: Approaches to State and Society in Sung Dynasty China. Berkeley: University of California Press, Where does Neo-Confucianism—a movement that from the twelfth to the seventeenth centuries profoundly influenced the way people understood the world and responded to it—fit into our story of China’s history?This interpretive, at times polemical, inquiry into the Neo-Confucian engagement with the literati as the social and political elite, local society, and the imperial state during the.

Illustrations of the Yijing Numerology as an Exegetical Method in Northern Song China. Qin Yang. Commentaries on the Yijing (Book of changes) before the eleventh century had been built mainly on the statements of hexagrams and the configuration of lines.

Stories of human mobility are often stories of the formation, or re-formation, of. is from his commentary on the Book of Changes. What follows after are selections from the two Cheng brothers, Cheng Hao (Ch’eng Hao ) and Cheng I (Ch’eng Yi ), founders of the Cheng Zhu school of Neo-Confucianism, noteworthy for the development of the concept of principle (li), an essential feature of Size: KB.

The Yijing and Chinese Politics: Classical Commentary And Literati Activism in the Northern Song Period, Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, • Lai, Whalen.

“The. I Ching. and the Formation of the Hua-Yen Philosophy.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy. 7/3 (September ): – [ available online at. The Southern Song philosopher Zhu Xi () is known for his synthesis of Neo-Confucian philosophy. Zhu Xi wrote commentaries to the Four Books of the Confucian tradition, which he extolled as central to the education of scholars.

Zhu Xi was also active in the theory and practice of education and in the compiling of a practical manual of family ritual. Neo-Confucianism (Chinese: 宋明理學; pinyin: Sòng-Míng lǐxué, often shortened to lixue 理學) is a moral, ethical, and metaphysical Chinese philosophy influenced by Confucianism, and.

It is commonly known that the “Song School of Yijing commentaries” (Song Yi, hereafter, Song School) dominated the studies of this classic in late imperial China.

From its rise to prominence in the Northern Song () through its codification and canonization in the early Ming (ca. ) to its decline and fall in the mid Qing (ca. Confucianism (kənfyōō´shənĬzəm), moral and religious system of origins go back to the Analects (see Chinese literature), the sayings attributed to Confucius, and to ancient commentaries, including that of Mencius.

Early History and Precepts In its early form (before the 3d cent. BC) Confucianism was primarily a system of ethical precepts for the proper management of society.

This article is an attempt to summarize the most important aspects of Zhu Xi’s classical scholarship. Zhu Xi is most famous for his commentaries on the Four Books, a compendium that he compiled.

* The Synthesis of Song Neo-confucianism in 朱熹 * * liken principle in things to a seed of grain - each partakes of both unity and diversity - principle for Zhu was real both in ties substantial unity and in its functional diversity * one’s moral is fundamentally good, the human mind is in essence one with the mind of the universe, capable.

The Yijing and Chinese Politics: Classical Commentary and Literati Activism in the Northern Song Period, Albany: State University of New York Press, _____. "Classical Exegesis and Social Change: The Song School of Yijing Commentaries in Late Imperial China." Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies, (), Neo-Confucianism was one of the central threads of intellectual and cultural continuity between the Song, Yuan, and Ming periods.

When the teachings, conceptions, and core texts of the great Neo-Confucian scholars entered examination education in the late Southern Song and became required reading in Yuan and Ming, Neo-Confucianism became a.

The revival of Confucianism, called Neo-Confucianism, happened during the Song dynasty; it held quite a few similarities to Classical Confucianism, but it also incorporated many of its own ideas, borrowing concepts from Confucianism’s old rivals, Daoism and Buddhism. This essay maps the changing contours of Yijing 《易經》 exegesis, focusing in particular on certain specialized terms that deal with the related problems of “knowing fate” and “establishing fate”.

Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism, Misc in Asian Philosophy. Yijing (The Book of Change) Yijing (The Book of Change) in Asian. Books and Editions. The Yijing and Chinese Politics: Classical Commentary and Literati Activism in the Northern Song Period, (Albany: State University of New York Press, ) Revolution as Restoration: Guocui xuebao and China′s Path to Modernity, (Leiden: Brill, ) Proceedings.

First, I will find out why Zhu Xi felt the need to compile and annotate the Four Books. Second, I will examine Zhu Xi’s two methods of connecting the four texts: (1) Adding prefaces to highlight the common themes among the texts; and (2) aggressively modifying the tenor and texture of the four texts by either dividing them into “verses and.

Neo-Confucianism is a philosophically sophisticated tradition weaving classical Confucianism together with themes from Buddhism and Daoism.

It began in China around the eleventh century CE, played a leading role in East Asian cultures over the last millennium, and. Goodman, "Exegetes and Exegeses of the Book of Changes in the Third Century a.d.: Historical and Scholastic Contexts for Wang Pi" (Ph.D.

diss., Princeton University, ); Tze-ki Hon, "Northern Song Yijing Exegesis and the Formation of Neo-Confu cianism" (Ph.D. diss., University of Chicago, ); and Larry James Schulz, "Lai Chih. -the real architect of Neo-Confucianism was a man named Zhu Xi (Chu Hsi; CE), who lived during the early Southern Song (Sung) Dynasty.

-Shortly before his birth, 'barbarians' from the north attacked and took over the northern part of China, forcing the Song rulers to move their capital to the south (see maps below). Neo-Confucianism is a moral, ethical, and metaphysical Chinese philosophy influenced by Confucianism, and originated with Han Yu and Li Ao in the Tang Dynasty, and became prominent during the Song.

In historical terms, Neo-Confucianism refers to the revival of Confucian thought that began in the Tang Dynasty, intensified in the Song, and lingered beyond.

That's about as much as I can say confidently. Umbrella term -isms are tricky to define. The Yijing /Binary System Episode involved Leibniz' discovery of a de facto representation of the binary number system in the sixty-four-hexagram Fu Xi "Yijing."Scholars have left the match unexplained, since they have found no evidence of a forgotten binary number system in ancient China.

The interesting similarities and differences are discussed between the thought of Leibniz and that of.The Yijing and Chinese Politics: Classical Commentary and Literati Activism in the Northern Song Period, Tze-Ki Hon This book is the first comprehensive study of Yijing (Book of Changes) commentary during the Northern Song period, showing how it reflects a coming to terms with major political and social changes.The impetus for the first of these painters was found in the Five Dynasties () and the Northern Song ().

A most important occurrence of the period was the initial printing of the Classical Books finished in For the first time the supply of books became cheap and abundant.

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